Window Types 

There are different types of windows, other than how they look externally – just different shapes - in your property each window type has its own features which distinguish it from other kinds of windows. 
Using the right window in the appropriate situation makes for a more efficient and functional space, whether it's your kitchen, family room or bathroom. Here are some examples of the most popular window types we install at Oriel Glazing. 

Casement Windows 

Casement windows operate like a door, swinging out from one side or the other. 
The pros and cons of casement windows are: 
The casement pane can act as a 'scoop' to catch breezes and direct them into the room. 
There is usually no pane frame in the middle of the window, so they can offer better sight lines to obstruct the view like there is with single/double hung windows. 
They offer some of the best energy efficiency you'll find among windows, because the way a casement window closes; it pushes against a seal and a latch mechanism provides positive force to pull the window pane into the seal. 
They work well in scenarios where limited reach or physical accessibility is restricted. 
Casement windows take up space when opened because of their swing-out design. If the area outside the window is a walkway or a patio the open sash might be an obstruction. 
Casement windows can be limited by built-in obstacles like a roofline or shrubbery which can limit how far the window can be opened. 

Double Hung Sash 

The double hung sash window is the traditional style of window in the UK with two parts (sashes) that overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame. The two parts are not necessarily the same size. These days, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes, but traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. 

Double Hung Sash 

The double hung sash window is the traditional style of window in the UK with two parts (sashes) that overlap slightly and slide up and down inside the frame. The two parts are not necessarily the same size. These days, most new double-hung sash windows use spring balances to support the sashes, but traditionally, counterweights held in boxes on either side of the window were used. 

Sliding Windows 

Sliders normally can have one or two panes which simply slide over each other from right to left or vice versa depending on the design. These windows typically have a means of easily removing the sash from the inside for easier cleaning. 
The pros and cons of sliding windows are: 
 
You can have a wider window, which can be opened 
You need to consider a window which is easier to open as the sliding operation of a sliding window may also be easier to open for some individuals than the push-up/down motion associated with other window styles 
Sliding windows are space savers because they don't have any swing-out space considerations to contend with 

Tilt & Turn Windows 

The tilt and turn window can swing open like a casement window and also tilt inward from the top. However unlike most casement windows the pane swings inward instead of to the outside like most casement windows. Tilt-turn windows are usually controlled by a single handle. The direction or extent to which you turn the handle determines if the window opens as a tilting window or swings like a casement window 
The pros and cons of the tilt-turn window style are: 
 
Design and operational flexibility - a window that can 'do more things' and thereby offer you more choices as far as how you can use it. 
If you want just a little ventilation you can tilt in the top of the window like a traditional window, while giving you the security against anything or anyone getting in or out of the window. 
This also means the open sash will take up room in your interior space since it's an in-swing window, depending on how wide you open it. 
The tilt and turn window can swing open like a casement window and also tilt inward from the top. However unlike most casement windows the pane swings inward instead of to the outside like most casement windows. Tilt-turn windows are usually controlled by a single handle. The direction or extent to which you turn the handle determines if the window opens as a tilting window or swings like a casement window 
The pros and cons of the tilt-turn window style are: 
 
Design and operational flexibility - a window that can 'do more things' and thereby offer you more choices as far as how you can use it. 
If you want just a little ventilation you can tilt in the top of the window like a traditional window , while giving you the security against anything or anyone getting in or out of the window. 
This also means the open sash will take up room in your interior space since it's an in-swing window, depending on how wide you open it. 

Bay and Bow Windows 

Bay windows and bow windows are similar as they both project outward from an exterior wall. On the inside they offer space for a window seat or a shelf. 
They differ in the number of windows panes that make up the complete assembly: 
Bay windows are usually made up of 3 windows; a centre window that's flanked by two windows that are angled back from the centre window. 
Bow windows are made up of 4 or more window units and form a more gentle curve compared with the more angular bay window. You can see 4, 5 or even 6-unit bow windows. 
The pros and cons offered by these types of windows are: 
 
broader views outside 
additional interior space and the ability to capture more light 
add a design/architectural detail to enhance the outside of your home 
however, both bay and bow windows require a roof since they project out from the side of the house and the roofing material will need to tie into the home's siding with proper flashing and weather-proofing. 
Bay windows and bow windows are similar as they both project outward from an exterior wall. On the inside they offer space for a window seat or a shelf. 
They differ in the number of windows panes that make up the complete assembly: 
Bay windows are usually made up of 3 windows; a centre window that's flanked by two windows that are angled back from the centre window. 
Bow windows are made up of 4 or more window units and form a more gentle curve compared with the more angular bay window. You can see 4, 5 or even 6-unit bow windows. 
The pros and cons offered by these types of windows are: 
 
broader views outside 
additional interior space and the ability to capture more light. 
add a design/architectural detail to enhance the outside of your home. 
however, both bay and bow windows require a roof since they project out from the side of the house and the roofing material will need to tie into the home's siding with proper flashing and weather-proofing. 
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